Author: EA

WFU Press releases The Shack and Conor O’Callaghan reads “Swell”

I piled into the back a minivan with my parents, my sister and my sister’s daughters last Friday and made the 6-ish hour drive from Atlanta to Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The destination was Wake Forest University, specifically a small book release party commemorating the publication of The Shack, a collection of poems and essays by various Irish poets who had come to the university over the years when invited by my Uncle Dillon. Many of these visitors would stay in a run-down, bare-bones little cabin that Dillon and his wife, Guinn kept just across the boarder in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. The cabin came to be affectionately known as “The Shack” and this book is dedicated to both Dillon and Guinn. Arguably, the best part of this celebration was the poetry readings by Irish poet Conor O’Callaghan. I snagged some video of the event and here present O’Callaghan reading “Swell”, from his latest collection titled The Sun King. This entire poem is really just right, but the stanza that hits me each time, like something warm and light, is this one: “All I mean to say is that it was lovely, that not every given is bleak or wrong and some even are as gorgeous as they are elementary.” I can’t quite explain why those lines strike me as perfect, as the epitome of a poem being at work...

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Torres, Self-Titled: Album Review

Album: Torres Artist: Torres Year Released: 2013 Of all the albums I’ve listened to in 2013, only one has clung to my consciousness and literally haunted my dreams.  The album, Torres, by Torres, the musical pseudonym of Mackenzie Scott, is emotionally and audibly raw to the point where it is sometimes painful to hear, and yet, the album reaches such subtle and delicate heights that the heartache it conveys feels somehow beautiful, true and strangely invigorating. Don’t let the opening track, “Mother Earth, Father God”, fool you.  Torres is not trying to be Tori Amos or Sharon Van Etten or Cat...

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Don’t Call It a Comeback

I started writing music posts on EA’s Brain back in 2008, mostly because everyone I knew had some kind of blog and I wanted a place to talk about my favorite music.  Over the years, EA’s Brain has gone through a few different phases, each one reflecting my attitudes towards music at the time. Sometime last fall, I made a decision to let the blog go, mostly because I realized that I was focusing so much on listening to every new album that I could get my hands on that I was losing the ability to simply enjoy the...

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Atlanta Band “Wolves” at The Masquerade: Live Show Review

As an Atlanta native, there is nothing I like so much as to see my hometown contribute something legitimately good to the cultural landscape.  With so many of my favorite bands coming from Brooklyn or L.A. or remote mid-western locations, I sometimes feel guilty that I don’t know more of the emerging musicians in my own city.  In an attempt to change that, I made a short trip to The Masquerade last night and heard the super-talented new band Wolves. Although they had four musicians on stage last night, Wolves is essentially a duo, made up of Kyle Dreaden,...

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The Henry Clay People, Twenty-Five for the Rest of Our Lives: Album Review

Album: Twenty Five for the Rest of Our Lives Artist: The Henry Clay People Year:2012   It’s been a good summer for punk rock.  Bands like Japandroids, Deer Tick, and to a lesser extent, Gentleman Jesse are proving that hard rock as a relevant sound is far from over.  In the incredible heat of this July, The Henry Clay People have released a punk rock album that is at once nostalgic and fresh.  Twenty-Five for the Rest of Our Lives is an exuberant, fast-paced proclamation that punk rock, while it may not change the world, can at least change the...

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